News

Dangerous wild grass will be used in batteries: Scientists from NUST MISIS have turned hogweed into a material for a supercapacitor

Hogweed, which has grown over vast territories of Russia, can be useful as a material for batteries. Scientists from NUST MISIS have investigated the possibilities of fibrous substances in the plant stems. They have turned them into electrodes — elements of devices capable of storing energy. It was experimentally proven that the treated dangerous plant can successfully replace traditional sources of energy without compromising the quality of the batteries.

Human Heat to Electric Energy: New Materials Will Power Gadgets Uninterruptedly

Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology MISIS (Russia) together with their colleagues from Lulea University of Technology (Sweden) and Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) developed the world’s first thermoelectric material with ordered nanotubes. Due to the polymer nature, it is flexible, and the addition of nanotubes several times increases its electrical conductivity. In the future, this material can be used to charge mobile devices without an additional power source: one such bracelet or case would allow one to charge their watch or phone directly from the heat of the human body. An article about the development is published in Advanced Functional Materials.

30 Shades of Steel: Scientists Develop “Cheat Sheet” for the Creation of New Steels

Researchers from the National University of Science and Technology “MISIS” developed a database that will help create new grades of steels. This will to speed up the process of creating innovative steel grades with specified strength and ductility allow at least 10 times, which will allow manufacturing car bodies of the most complex shapes. Article on the research is published in “Calphad”.

Ancient Lead Can Help Experimental Physics

Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology MISIS measured the number of trace impurities in the ingots of ancient lead from the sunken ship of the ancient Romans, using a novel technology. It was shown that lead, which stayed underwater for 1500 years, contains such a small amount of radioactive elements — Uranium and Thorim, that it can be used without any purification in one of the most “demanding” areas — Nuclear physics — in the study of elementary particles. The experiment on the selection and determination of micro-impurities was carried out in cooperation with colleagues from the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research and the National Center for Scientific Research (France). An article about the development published in the journal Talanta.

Aluminum is The New Steel: Scientists Made it Stronger than Ever Before

Aluminum is one of the most promising materials for aeronautics and automobile industry. Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology “MISIS” found a simple and efficient way of strengthening aluminum-based composite materials. Doping aluminum melt with nickel and lanthanum, scientists managed to create a material combining benefits of both composite materials and standard alloys: flexibility, strength, lightness. The article on the research is published in Materials Letters.